Group Dynamics

Group Dynamics

            Frequently, people confuse between groups and teams. A group may be defines as set of people who recognize themselves as a unit but actually work independently to bring out results. Whereas a team may be a group of people who are organized by a specific structure come together to complete a common goal. The major difference between groups and teams is that any bad quality of work performed by an individual in a group doesn’t affect the unit as any other member may cover it where as in the case of teams the unit is affected greatly because people are assigned specific tasks that cannot be completed by others (Barbara O., Richard M. F., & Rebecca B., 2004).  It could be said that a smart arrangement of members of a group is a team although a formal arrangement based on knowledge and seniority is followed in it. Group think is the mental phenomenon affecting members of a group to take faulty decisions ultimately leading to degradation. This can be avoided if proper roles are assigned to each and every member of the team by an effective team leader. Routine discussions made by members regarding the standings of a group and periodic visits of senior managers to insect standings also reduces groupthink (Baron R. S., 2005).  Cohesiveness in a group is the degree to which the members of a group are attached to one another emotionally. As cohesiveness of a group increases there is a greater chance of groupthink.  Though cohesiveness makes people misbehave in a group by sharing irrelevant thoughts, it has its own benefits. Communication among the members of the group becomes extensive. Increase in bonding between people of a group makes it to function as a single unit and not as individuals of a group thus resulting in a synergic reaction increasing the functional efficiency. Members of a group becomes much more satisfied and this enables them to work longer, share more ideas, offer solutions to one another etc. Thus from the above statements we could conclude that the presence of cohesiveness in a group always uplifts a group to a great extent but at the same time if it goes out of the limits, it becomes the primary reason for its degradation.

References

Jex, S. M., & Britt, T. W. (2008). Organizational psychology: A scientist-practitioner approach

(2nd ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons.

Barbara O., Richard M. F., & Rebecca B. (2004). Turning Student Groups into Effective Teams.

Resource: www.ncsu.edu/felder-public/Papers/Oakley-paper(JSCL).pdf

Baron R. S. (2005). Groupthink and the ubiquitous nature of polarized group decision-making.

Resource: ion.uwinnipeg.ca/~clark/teach/3480/Groupthink-Baron.pdf

Resource: www.acemyhw.com